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Captiol Jazz classics Vol 8/Trio Days

Captiol Jazz classics Vol 8/Trio Days

Cole, Nat King

NM/NM

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

I Don't Want To Be Hurt Anymore

I Don't Want To Be Hurt Anymore

Cole, Nat King

NM/NM

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Greatest Hits

Greatest Hits

Goulet, Robert

NM/VG+

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

We Made It Happen

We Made It Happen

Humperdinck, E...

NM/NM

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Sings

Sings

Chamberlain, R...

VG-/VG

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Sings

Sings

Chamberlain, R...

VG-/VG

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Golden Folk Hits

Golden Folk Hits

Darin, Bobby

VG-/VG

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

To Each His Own

To Each His Own

Laine, Frankie

VG/VG+

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

That Old Feeling

That Old Feeling

Sinatra, Frank

VG+/VG

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

That Old Feeling

That Old Feeling

Sinatra, Frank

VG/VG

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

That Old Feeling

That Old Feeling

Sinatra, Frank

VG/VG

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Songs I Love To Sing

Songs I Love To Sing

Benton, Brook

VG/VG

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Tribute To Ethel Waters

Tribute To Ethel Waters

Carroll, Diahann

VG+/VG+

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Those Lazy Hazy Crazy Days Of

Those Lazy Hazy Crazy Days Of

Cole, Nat King

VG+/VG-

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Nice n Easy

Nice n Easy

Sinatra, Frank

VG/VG+

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Songs From Lost Horizon

Songs From Lost Horizon

Ames, Ed

VG/VG+

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Tony Sings The Great Hits Of

Tony Sings The Great Hits Of

Bennett, Tony

VG+/VG-

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Greatest Hits

Greatest Hits

Charles, Ray

VG/VG+

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Greatset Hits

Greatset Hits

Charles, Ray

VG/VG-

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

Beautiful Ballads

Beautiful Ballads

Cole, Nat King

VG/VG+

?

Sealed (S) means the record shrink wrap was never opened. However, sometimes the older records that have a plastic inner sleeve is still sealed, but there is no shrink wrap over the cover.

Near Mint (NM) A nearly perfect record. Should show no obvious signs of wear. An LP Jacket should have no creases, folds, seam splits or any other noticeable similar defect. Some say, covers should have no co marks, but we have many sealed items that have that, so we still consider a Near mint cover with a co mark as Near mint, if it is truly clean and glossy.

Very Good (VG+) Will show some signs that is was played but was generally cared for. Surface of vinyl could have some light scuffs or very light scratches that don't affect the sound. The label may have some ring wear or discoloration, but it should be barely noticeable. The LP jacket may have slight signs of wear and could have a slight seam split.

Very Good (VG-) Many of the defects found in a vg+ record will be more pronounced in a VG disc. Surface noise will be evident upon playing, especially in soft passages and during a song's into and fade, but will not overpower the music otherwise. Groove wear could be noticeable, as well as light scratches (but do not normally affect the sound). Covers may be soiled or have multiple problems like split seams (normally only one side or slight on two edges).

Very Good (VG) This grade means the record is still can be enjoyable and that it will not skip but may have loud ticks and a scratchy sound all through out the recordings.

Good (G) Good does not mean Bad. Some of the 50's jazz records might only be listed in Good condition, but may play better than they look because of being a deep groove, (where a disc grooves were cut deeper into the vinyl). The record should play without skipping but could be quite noisy. The jacket will have seam splits, tape, writing, excessive ring wear. This is getting to point of buying to collect only if you are desperate for this title.

Poor (P) What can we say about poor. Sometimes the record is so rare and hard to find, that we include them for collectors who might be looking to fill a tempora

   

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